hu7EB316 - GET-Evidence variant report

Variant report for hu7EB316

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VariantClinical
Importance
ImpactAllele
freq
Summary
1FLG-S761ShiftModerateUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.00793651Based on other severe variants in the same gene, this variant is likely to cause ichthyosis vulgaris when homozygous or compound heterozygous with another severe variant. Some authors report the variant has incomplete dominance, with heterozygotes generally having a very mild phenotype: some palmar hyperlinearity, keratosis pilaris and, in some cases fine scale.1
2COL4A1-Q1334HLowLikelyLikely pathogenic

Dominant, Heterozygous
0.324689This common variant has been associated with arterial stiffness and, in Japanese, a small increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI, a.k.a. heart attack). This last observation supported a dominant effect for this variant and, assuming a lifetime risk of 15% for MI, we estimate carriers have an additional risk of 0.5-3%.1
3MTRR-I49MLowLikelyLikely pathogenic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.451199This common variant (HapMap allele frequency of 31.3%) in a protein involved in folate (B9) and cobalamin (B12) metabolism and is often reported as "MTRR I22M" (an alternative transcript position). Mothers homozygous for this variant are associated with having around a increased chance of a child with Down syndrome (risk of 0.4%, average risk in population is 0.25%). Notably, age plays a far larger role in the rate of Down syndrome (risk is 4.5% for a mother 45-years-of-age), and it is unknown how this variant may combine with the effect of age. There are conflicting reports associating this variant with incidence of neural tube defects, possibly when combined with MTHFR A222V.1
4CETP-A390PLowLikelyLikely pathogenic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.0388548This variant is associated with slightly lower HDL (good) cholesterol, although it has a negligible effect (around 2 mg/dl).1
5PRF1-R4HLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Dominant, Heterozygous
0.0272881This rare variant was reported seen in an individual with acquired aplastic anemia, but the frequency of this allele in controls indicates is no different from the cases, indicating this is likely a polymorphism without dramatic functional effect.1
6ELAC2-S217LLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.273471Reported to be associated with increased susceptibility to prostate cancer, but later studies weaken the hypothesis. Xu et al.'s meta-analysis concludes that there is a small but significant increased risk (OR = 1.13). Assuming a lifetime risk of 16% for prostate cancer we calculate this leads to an increased risk of ~1.5% (17.5% total).1
7ERCC6-R1213GLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.196877When homozygous, this variant may cause Cockayne Syndrome, which is a severe autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by abnormal early growth and development, abnormal sensitivity to sunlight, and premature aging. Cockayne Syndrome Type I and Type II lead to death in early childhood. Several other variants in the ERCC6 gene are linked to Cockayne Syndrome. This variant may also be linked to age-related macular degeneration like other ERCC6 variants, and has been linked to colorectal cancer in one study. 1
8SP110-L425SLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Unknown, Homozygous
0.863357This variant is associated with a slightly increased risk of tuberculosis. It is unclear whether it is itself causal, or in linkage disequilibrium with some other causal variant that has a stronger effect.1
9DYX1C1-E417XLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.20147One study reports this variant to be associated with dyslexia. The study group was relatively small and so the results did not have strong significance. If they are representative this variant is associated with a doubled risk for dyslexia, but it is unclear whether the effect would be additive, dominant, or recessive.1
10HFE-H63DLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.109965There have been some hypotheses that this variant contributes to causing hereditary hemochromatosis, possibly as a compound heterozygote, but some others treat it as a polymorphism. Cys282Tyr is the classic causal variant and itself has very low penetrance. Mouse studies indicates this variant has a similar but weaker effect; if it has any effect at all its penetrance may be quite low and/or require modifier alleles.1
11TP53-P72RLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Unknown, Homozygous
0.627743This is a common variant was first reported as a polymorphism. It has since had mixed associations with cancer: Storey et al. conclude a 7x *increased* risk of HPV cancer for homozygotes vs hets, but Jones et al. find a 1.98x *decreased* risk for colorectal cancer. This variant may have significant impact on particular cancers, but it is unclear what effect it has on the overall burden of cancer.1
12ITPA-P32TLowWell-establishedWell-established pharmacogenetic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.0609779This variant is associated with inosine triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase deficiency and may be associated with an adverse reaction to thiopurine drugs (which are used as immunosuppressants). Homozygotes have no detectable ITPase activity, individuals compound heterozygous with another less severe mutation also have severely reduced enzyme activity.1
13rs1544410LowUncertainUncertain pharmacogenetic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.351562rs1544410 is a Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) single nucleotide polymorphism. It is unlikely that it has functional significance because it is located in an intron (Liu et. al.), but it is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs731236 (Dvornyk et al), which is located in an exon. 1
14ABCC6-R1268QLowUncertainUncertain pharmacogenetic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.218907This common polymorphism appears to not have a significant phenotypic impact. A few studies report weak but significant associations with plasma lipids (in Inuits) and thalidomide toxicity.1
15KCNJ11-K23ELowLikelyLikely protective

Unknown, Homozygous
0.738148This variant is associated with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes. It is unclear whether this variant has additive effects, or acts in a dominant or recessive manner. Assuming diabetes has a lifetime risk of 36%, we estimate a decreased risk of around 1-2% per copy of this variant.1
16MTR-D919GLowUncertainUncertain protective

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.217234This variant was weakly associated with a protective effect vs. colorectal cancer, but only in individuals with low alcohol consumption. 1
17IRS2-G1057DLowUncertainUncertain protective

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.232615a.k.a Gly1057Asp, insulin receptor substrate-2 IRS2. The rs1805097(G) allele is associated with the Gly, and the (A) allele with Asp. A longevity study concluded that rs1805097(A;A) individuals were about twice as likely to live over 85 y/o (odds ratio 2.03, CI:1.39-2.99, p = .0003). 1
18ARSA-N350SLowWell-establishedWell-established benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.183199This common variant (HapMap 24.1% allele frequency) causes a loss of a glycosylation site (affecting the size of the protein when studied with gel electrophoresis) but does not affect enzyme activity or stability.1
19GABRD-R220HLowLikelyLikely benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.0161891Probably benign, one report hypothesized this variant was associated with epilepsy, but a follow-up investigation failed to establish any statistically significant difference for this variant's incidence in control vs. affected populations.1
20PMS2-P470SLowLikelyLikely benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.374884Benign, common variant.1
21RPGRIP1-A547SLowUncertainUncertain benign

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.232202Probably benign. Implicated in causing autosomal recessive cone-rod dystrophy, but a later report found the same incidence in controls and concludes it is not causal.1
22TAS2R38-A49PLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.431121This variant is strongly associated with causing the "taster" phenotype of phenylthiocarbamine (PTC) in a dominant manner.1
23APOB-Y1422CLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.999628This position is almost certainly an error in the HG18 reference sequence. 1
24TAS2R38-I296VLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.463376This variant is associated with "taster" status of PTC, along with 49P and 262A. Due to linkage disequilibrium, the independent effects of positions 296 and 262 is unclear. The presence of 49P confers taster status in a dominant fashion, but in the absence of 49P, the presence of 262A/296V is still positively associated with tasting PTC.1
25DSPP-R68WLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.143045Probably benign. One report linked this to causing dentinogenesis Imperfecta type II in a large Swedish family, but subsequent publications have observed this is a common variant and conclude it is a nonpathogenic polymorphism.1
26SLC45A2-L374FLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.691764Pigmentation allele for non-black hair, and consequently, possible increased susceptibility to malignant melanoma.1
27PCSK9-G670ELowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.888269This variant is likely benign. 1
28PHYH-P29SLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.155326Probably benign. This variant was implicated as causing Refsum Disease in a recessive manner, but a subsequent publication noted that all instances were linked with other explanatory mutations. The high allele frequency of this variant in the population (7-13%) contradicts a pathogenic hypothesis.1
29PKP2-L366PLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.221231This variant is a benign polymorphism. 1
30FMO3-V257MLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.0570738This common variant (HapMap allele frequency of 9.2%) appears to have no functional effect. OMIM has recorded it as having been seen homozygously in an individual with Trimethylaminuria, but Treacy et al. 1998 conclude it is a polymorphism.1
31FANCA-S1088FLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.0584681Probably benign. One report hypothesized this variant causing Fanconi Anemia, but the allele frequency (3-7%) is high enough to contradict a highly penetrant pathogenic effect. Later authors have concluded this is a polymorphism, not pathogenic.1
VariantPrioritization scoreAllele
freq
Num of
articles
Zygosity and Prioritization Score Reasons

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"GENE" or "GENE A123C":

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