huC5824D (genome Mitchell Lifton) - GET-Evidence variant report

Variant report for huC5824D (genome Mitchell Lifton)

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VariantClinical
Importance
ImpactAllele
freq
Summary
1ABCA4-G1961EHighLikelyLikely pathogenic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.00269567This rare variant causes Stargardt Disease in a recessive manner. It was hypothesized to increase susceptibility to age-related macular degeneration, but subsequent studies have contradicted this hypothesis.1
2COL4A1-Q1334HLowLikelyLikely pathogenic

Dominant, Heterozygous
0.324689This common variant has been associated with arterial stiffness and, in Japanese, a small increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI, a.k.a. heart attack). This last observation supported a dominant effect for this variant and, assuming a lifetime risk of 15% for MI, we estimate carriers have an additional risk of 0.5-3%.1
3NOD2-R702WLowLikelyLikely pathogenic

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.0334821NOD2 encodes a protein involved in bacterial recognition. This variant is associated with Crohn's disease in European populations, but not in Korean or Japanese groups.1
4MBL2-R52CLowLikelyLikely pathogenic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.048615This variant is associated with mannose binding protein deficiency which leads to impaired complement system immune response to mannose-rich pathogens. Patients homozygous for this allele or compound heterozygous are likely to have increased susceptibility to infection, but Hellemann et al. report heterosis for intensive care outcomes in heterozygous subjects. The wild-type version of this gene is known as variant allele A, while this is called variant allele D. See G54D (variant B) and G57E (variant C).1
5WFS1-R611HLowUncertainUncertain not reviewed

Recessive, Homozygous
0.400446This nonsynonymous SNP is associated with Wolfram Syndrome (known as DIDMOAD), which is characterized by early-onset non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, optic atrophy, and deafness) and to adult Type Two Diabetes Mellitus. The WFS1 gene maps to chromosome 4p16.3. The variant has been shown to be statistically associated with type II diabetes in six UK studies and one study of Ashkenazi Jews (Sandhu, M., et al., Minton et al.).1
6TP53-P72RLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Unknown, Homozygous
0.627743This is a common variant was first reported as a polymorphism. It has since had mixed associations with cancer: Storey et al. conclude a 7x *increased* risk of HPV cancer for homozygotes vs hets, but Jones et al. find a 1.98x *decreased* risk for colorectal cancer. This variant may have significant impact on particular cancers, but it is unclear what effect it has on the overall burden of cancer.1
7SP110-L425SLowUncertainUncertain pathogenic

Unknown, Homozygous
0.863357This variant is associated with a slightly increased risk of tuberculosis. It is unclear whether it is itself causal, or in linkage disequilibrium with some other causal variant that has a stronger effect.1
8CYP2C9-R144CModerateWell-establishedWell-established pharmacogenetic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.0970982This variant, also called CYP2C9*2, is a pharmacogenetic variant that modulates sensitivity for Warfarin (due to reduced metabolism). This variant is associated with Caucasians. The FDA has approved reduced recommended Warfarin dosage based on the presence of this variant.1
9ITPA-P32TLowWell-establishedWell-established pharmacogenetic

Recessive, Carrier (Heterozygous)
0.0609779This variant is associated with inosine triphosphate pyrophosphohydrolase deficiency and may be associated with an adverse reaction to thiopurine drugs (which are used as immunosuppressants). Homozygotes have no detectable ITPase activity, individuals compound heterozygous with another less severe mutation also have severely reduced enzyme activity.1
10rs1544410LowUncertainUncertain pharmacogenetic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.351562rs1544410 is a Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) single nucleotide polymorphism. It is unlikely that it has functional significance because it is located in an intron (Liu et. al.), but it is in strong linkage disequilibrium with rs731236 (Dvornyk et al), which is located in an exon. 1
11ABCC6-R1268QLowUncertainUncertain pharmacogenetic

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.218907This common polymorphism appears to not have a significant phenotypic impact. A few studies report weak but significant associations with plasma lipids (in Inuits) and thalidomide toxicity.1
12NPC1-H215RLowLikelyLikely protective

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.295687This variant is associated with a reduced risk of obesity, with an additive effect of -0.084 BMI per allele (an average of 0.54 pounds less, per allele, in a 5'6" individual). 1
13TOR1A-D216HLowLikelyLikely protective

Unknown, Homozygous
0.102993This SNP has been shown to be benign and play a protective role against Dystonia. 1
14TGFB1-T263ILowUncertainUncertain protective

Dominant, Heterozygous
0.0205429Carriers may be less likely to have cleft lip and palate congenital deformity.1
15MTR-D919GLowUncertainUncertain protective

Complex/Other, Heterozygous
0.217234This variant was weakly associated with a protective effect vs. colorectal cancer, but only in individuals with low alcohol consumption. 1
16IRS2-G1057DLowUncertainUncertain protective

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.232615a.k.a Gly1057Asp, insulin receptor substrate-2 IRS2. The rs1805097(G) allele is associated with the Gly, and the (A) allele with Asp. A longevity study concluded that rs1805097(A;A) individuals were about twice as likely to live over 85 y/o (odds ratio 2.03, CI:1.39-2.99, p = .0003). 1
17PMS2-P470SLowLikelyLikely benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.374884Benign, common variant.1
18MLH1-I219VLowUncertainUncertain benign

Dominant, Heterozygous
0.239822Computational evidence, functional assays, and case/control studies suggest this variant is probably benign.1
19PHYH-P29SLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.155326Probably benign. This variant was implicated as causing Refsum Disease in a recessive manner, but a subsequent publication noted that all instances were linked with other explanatory mutations. The high allele frequency of this variant in the population (7-13%) contradicts a pathogenic hypothesis.1
20PCSK9-G670ELowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.888269This variant is likely benign. 1
21RP1-N985YLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.348671Probably benign. One report linked this variant to high triglycerides, but a later paper found a nearby SNP with similar association and suggests that both findings are caused by linkage to an undiscovered causal variant.1
22TPCN2-G734ELowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Heterozygous
0.286166Pigmentation allele.1
23TAS2R38-I296VLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.463376This variant is associated with "taster" status of PTC, along with 49P and 262A. Due to linkage disequilibrium, the independent effects of positions 296 and 262 is unclear. The presence of 49P confers taster status in a dominant fashion, but in the absence of 49P, the presence of 262A/296V is still positively associated with tasting PTC.1
24SLC45A2-L374FLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.691764Pigmentation allele for non-black hair, and consequently, possible increased susceptibility to malignant melanoma.1
25TAS2R38-A49PLowUncertainUncertain benign

Unknown, Homozygous
0.431121This variant is strongly associated with causing the "taster" phenotype of phenylthiocarbamine (PTC) in a dominant manner.1
VariantPrioritization scoreAllele
freq
Num of
articles
Zygosity and Prioritization Score Reasons

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"GENE" or "GENE A123C":

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